RSVP for Health > FAQ about clinical studies at BWH & MGH

for patients & families

for clinical researchers (inside Partners)

for medical professionals (outside Partners)

for sponsors

about us

contact us

jobs

 

1. What is the RSVP for Health?

2. What are the benefits of volunteering to take part in clinical research?

3. Will I be compensated?

4. Will my travel expenses be reimbursed?

5. What kinds of clinical studies are available?

6. Are there any risks?

7. How are clinical studies approved?

8. How can I volunteer?

1. What is the RSVP for Health?

A: The RSVP for Health allows individuals to register to receive information about clinical studies in their areas of interest. The RSVP provides an opportunity for healthy volunteers, and individuals who have been diagnosed with a medical condition - to participate in medical research studies (sometimes called protocols or trials), or to remain informed about the types of studies focusing on diseases offered at MGH and BWH.

2. What are the benefits of volunteering to take part in clinical research?

A: Volunteers who take part in clinical research studies may:
-> Receive a thorough physical exam
-> Receive reimbursement for out of pocket expenses or compensation for
taking part in a study
-> Further medical knowledge
-> Have the satisfaction of helping someone suffering from a chronic, serious,
or life-threatening illness
-> Provide important scientific information for developing new disease treatments

3. Will I be compensated?

A: Studies which need healthy volunteers compensate volunteers for their time and, in some instances, for the inconvenience of a procedure. The study's principal investigator determines the amount of compensation.

To be compensated, volunteers must provide a Social Security or tax identification number and picture identification. Compensation of $600 or more is reported to the Internal Revenue Service and the volunteer will receive a "Form 1099-Other Income” at the end of the year.

4. Will my travel expenses be reimbursed?

A: Some studies offer reimbursement for a patient’s travel expenses (taxi) or parking expenses. The study staff will inform you about the availability of reimbursement at the time the study are explained to you.

5. What kinds of clinical studies are available?

A: Hundred of studies are conducted by BWH and MGH clinical researchers. Some studies need volunteers in good health and others involve patients with certain diseases. To advance medical science, volunteers are needed from every ethnic and racial group, and in all age groups. You can find information about studies which are open to enrollment on the CRnet home page.

Studies vary in length of time, location, age, gender, special requirements, medical exclusions, and procedures. You select the studies that interest you the most and for which you think you would qualify.

6. Are there any risks?

A: The study investigator and staff will explain any risks, requirements, restrictions, or possible side effects before you agree to take part in any study. It is wise and important that you ask them any questions or voice any concerns before you make a decision about taking part.

7. How are clinical studies approved?

A: Before a study is approved for volunteer participation, an institutional review board made up of physicians, scientists, non-scientists and lay people rigorously screen all studies for safety, ethics, and need. These studies meet all government regulations and the hospital’s policies for protection of participants.

8. How can I volunteer?

A: If you are considering participating in a clinical study, you can find information about studies currently recruiting volunteers by visiting the CRnet home page. If you enter your name into the Registry, you will be contacted about studies in your areas of interest.

To determine your eligibility for a study, you may need to complete medical questionnaire forms and the investigator and study staff will ask you additional questions. It is critical that you are honest and thorough in providing information about your medical and psychiatric history and about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you take. Accurate information allows investigators to judge whether the study poses any risk to you. You also must let the investigator know of your participation in any other research studies--past, present, or planned.

Before agreeing to participate in any study, the investigator will give you a consent form that explains the study in detail and in everyday, non-medical language. By signing this form, you indicate that you understand the study and volunteer to participate. As a volunteer, you are free to withdraw from, interrupt, or refuse to take part in a study at any time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


RSVP for Health

What You Should Know About Clinical Trials

FAQs About Clinical Studies At MGH & BWH

Search Open Trials By Therapeutic Area

Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP)

 


© Copyright 2003 Partners HealthCare System, Inc.